Courses

 Two-Semester First-Year Writing Courses

ENWR 1505-06 Writing and Critical Inquiry: The Stretch Sequence

Offers a two-semester approach to the First Writing Requirement. This sequence allows students to take more time, in smaller sections and with support from the Writing Center, practicing and reinforcing the activities that are central to the first-year writing course. Like ENWR 1510, ENWR 1505-06 approaches writing as a way of generating, representing, and reflecting on critical inquiry. Students contribute to an academic conversation about a specific subject of inquiry and learn to position their ideas and research in relation to the ideas and research of others.  Instructors place student writing at the center of course, encourage students to think on the page, and prepare them to reflect on contemporary forms of expression.  Students read and respond to each other’s writing in class regularly, and they engage in thoughtful reflection on their own rhetorical choices as well as those of peers and published writers.  Additionally, the course requires students to give an oral presentation on their research and to assemble a digital portfolio of their writing.

ENWR 1507/1508

Offers instruction in academic writing, critical inquiry, and the conventions of American English for non-native speakers of English. Space is limited, and priority is given to students who are required to take the sequence by recommendation of the admissions office, the transition program, or the writing program.

Single-Semester First-Year Writing Courses

ENWR 1510 Writing and Critical Inquiry

Approaches writing as a way of generating, representing, and reflecting on critical inquiry. Students contribute to an academic conversation about a specific subject of inquiry and learn to position their ideas and research in relation to the ideas and research of others.  Instructors place student writing at the center of course, encourage students to think on the page, and prepare them to reflect on contemporary forms of expression.  Students read and respond to each other’s writing in class regularly, and they engage in thoughtful reflection on their own rhetorical choices as well as those of peers and published writers.  Additionally, the course requires students to give an oral presentation on their research and to assemble a digital portfolio of their writing.

ENWR 2510 Advanced Writing Seminar

Beyond First-Year Writing

ENWR 2520 Special Topics in Writing

Offers a changing selection of inquiry-based writing courses in response to student interest and instructor availability. Past topics have included business and technical writing, sports writing, cyber-ethics, writing for the web, writing about law and literature, and creative non-fiction. If you are interested in having a particular ENWR 2520 topic offered in upcoming semesters, please contact the writing program to let us know. (Meets second writing requirement.)

ENWR 2610 Writing with Style

Investigates the role of style in the writing process. What does it mean to write with attention to style? How can attention to style be generative? Students will explore the variety, uses, and implications of a broad range stylistic moves available in prose writing and build a rich vocabulary for describing them. Students will imitate and analyze exemplary writing and discuss each other’s writing in a workshop setting. (Meets second writing requirement.)

ENWR 2620 Reviewing Popular Culture

Examines the variety of critical approaches to popular culture available to us as writers. How can we write in response to music, video games, television, and movies in ways that contribute to a larger critical conversation? What are the unique challenges to writing about popular culture? Students will read, analyze, and write a variety of multi-modal reviews of pop culture artifacts in a workshop setting. (Meets second writing requirement.)

ENWR 2630 Writing About Work

Uses inquiry-based writing to explore the role that work plays in the good life. We'll critically analyze how and why we write about work to refresh our thinking about real-world experiences both familiar and unfamiliar to us. We will develop as writers by generating and exploring  complicated questions. Why do we do the things that we do? What work do we value, and how do we communicate that? (Meets second writing requirement.)   

ENWR 2640 Composing Digital Stories and Essays

Explores how emerging technologies change the genres and modes of writing inside and outside of the academy. Students will produce both conventional print texts such as written narratives and personal essays, alongside more multimodal electronic texts, such as digital stories and academic web essays.  (Meets second writing requirement.)

ENWR 3640 Writing With Sound

Trains students to become attuned, thoughtful listeners and sonic composers. In addition to discussing key works on sound from fields such as rhetoric and composition, sound studies, and journalism, we will experiment with the possibilities of sound as a valuable form of writing and storytelling. Students will learn how to use digital audio editing tools, platforms, and techniques for designing and producing sonic projects. (Meets second writing requirement.) 

ENWR 3650 Digital Writing: Remix Culture

Explores the remix as a transformative compositional practice.  Remix culture raises poignant questions about originality, creativity, and the ethical and legal implications of twenty-first century forms of composition. Students will examine remixing through theoretical, historical, aesthetic, and political lenses in order to cultivate a deep understanding of the rhetorical and affective power of this genre. (Meets second writing requirement.) 

ENWR 3660 Travel Writing

Explores travel writing using a variety of texts, including essays, memoirs, blogs, photo essays, and narratives. We will examine cultural representations of travel as well as the ethical implications of tourism. Students will have the opportunity to write about their own travel experiences, and we will also embark on “local travel” of our own. 

ENWR 3665 Writing About the Environment

Focuses on creating meaningful, responsible, and engaged writing in the context of significant environmental issues. Analysis of representative environmental texts, familiarity with environmental concepts, examination of ethical positions in private and public spheres of writing, and sustained practice with form, style, medium, and genre will drive a variety of writing projects. (Meets second writing requirement.) 

ENPG 3800 Tutoring Peer Writers

Prepares undergraduates to tutor peer writers by introducing them to theories of writing and practices of peer tutoring. Students will read in the field of writing instruction, research primary materials (such as assignments and syllabi), observe tutors, and practice tutoring peer writers under supervised and supportive circumstances. (Meets second writing requirement.) 

ENWR 3900 The Forbes Seminars in Career-based Writing and Rhetoric

Develops proficiency in a range of stylistic and persuasive effects. The course is designed for students who want to hone their writing skills, as well as for students preparing for careers in which they will write documents for public circulation. Students explore recent research in writing studies. In the workshop-based studio sessions, students propose, write, and edit projects of their own design. (Meets second writing requirement.)